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Elliott Brown Classic Architecture
14 Jun 2021 - Elliott Brown
News & Updates

Look no clock hands on Old Joe (at the University of Birmingham)!

The Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower at the University of Birmingham, known more famously by his nickname of 'Old Joe' has been stuck at 12 for ages now. On Tuesday 8th June 2021, mobile cranes / cherry pickers went up to remove the hands from the clock faces. This is the start of work to repair the clock mechanisms. Before long you'll be able to read the time again!

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Look no clock hands on Old Joe (at the University of Birmingham)!





The Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower at the University of Birmingham, known more famously by his nickname of 'Old Joe' has been stuck at 12 for ages now. On Tuesday 8th June 2021, mobile cranes / cherry pickers went up to remove the hands from the clock faces. This is the start of work to repair the clock mechanisms. Before long you'll be able to read the time again!


See this Twitter thread from the University of Birmingham for more.

Having noticed some posts on Twitter about the clock tower at lunchtime, Tuesday 8th June 2021, I travelled down to the University of Birmingham, catching a no 61 bus from Bristol Street to the Bristol Road in Edgbaston (getting off near Edgbaston Park Road).

I walked up to the East Gate, and headed towards the Chancellor's Court via University Road East. This is between the Guild of Students and Barber Institute of Fine Arts (and opposite King Edward's School).

dndimg alt="East Gate University of Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/East Gate UoB (Jun 2021).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Heading towards University Square, I could already see the missing clock hands on one of the clock faces of Old Joe over the Watson Building (School of Mathematics).

dndimg alt="Old Joe University of Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Joe UoB (Jun 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This building is linked to the Poynting Building (Physics Department). Heading under the bridge and turning left into the Chancellor's Court.

dndimg alt="Old Joe University of Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Joe UoB (Jun 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There was barriers around the lawn, but you could still walk around the paths near the Aston Webb Building (in a semi circle).

dndimg alt="Old Joe University of Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Joe UoB (Jun 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

A zoom up to one of the clock faces, looks so weird without any clock hands. Also the brickwork could do with a clean, so much bird muck to wash off.

dndimg alt="Old Joe University of Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Joe UoB (Jun 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

I arrived in the afternoon, so missed the mobile cranes going up. Although they were still around the clock tower.

dndimg alt="Old Joe University of Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Joe UoB (Jun 2021) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Better lighting from this angle, two clock faces without hands!

dndimg alt="Old Joe University of Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Joe UoB (Jun 2021) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Not all hands had been taken down, the hand pointing to 6.

dndimg alt="Old Joe University of Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Joe UoB (Jun 2021) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Heading out past the Law Building, then down some steps towards the West Gate. The Aston Webb Building seen to the right of here.

dndimg alt="Old Joe University of Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Joe UoB (Jun 2021) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Now on University Road West, a look at the Faraday statue and Old Joe. The statue was a gift from the artist, Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, in the Centenary Year of the University of Birmingham (2000).

dndimg alt="Old Joe Faraday" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old Joe Faraday (Jun 2021).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Towards the West Gate and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, I initially got this rear view of the bronze Faraday statue. The University recently celebrated their 121st birthday, since their inception by a Royal Charter issued by Queen Victoria in 1900.

dndimg alt="Faraday QEHB" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Faraday QEHB (Jun 2021).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Heading past University Station, and crossing over New Fosse Way, followed the path towards the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, to catch my next bus, the 76. I initially waited at the next stop, but realised the 76 was extended from the QE to Northfield, and I wanted the 76 to Solihull. Other buses I saw included the 48 and 25. This was the closest I've got to the QE since the pandemic began in 2020.

dndimg alt="Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/QEHB Hospital Way (Jun 2021).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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Elliott Brown Classic Architecture
09 Jun 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

The original Curzon Street Station (1838 to 1893 / 1966)

Did you know that the first railway passenger station in Birmingham was opened at Curzon Street in 1838? Built by the London & Birmingham Railway, engineered by Robert Stephenson. The building was designed by the architect Philip Hardwick. It's time as the Birmingham terminus was shortlived after New Street opened in 1854. But continued for excursions to 1893 / goods to 1966.

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The original Curzon Street Station (1838 to 1893 / 1966)





Did you know that the first railway passenger station in Birmingham was opened at Curzon Street in 1838? Built by the London & Birmingham Railway, engineered by Robert Stephenson. The building was designed by the architect Philip Hardwick. It's time as the Birmingham terminus was shortlived after New Street opened in 1854. But continued for excursions to 1893 / goods to 1966.


Curzon Street Station

(1838 - passengers 1893 / goods 1966)

The first passenger railway linking London to Birmingham was opened in 1838. From London Euston to Birmingham Curzon Street. The station was originally called simply Birmingham Station (it was renamed Birmingham Curzon Street Station in 1852 after Birmingham New Street Station was being built and opened in 1854).

It was the terminus for both the London & Birmingham Railway and the Grand Junction Railway, with lines from London, Manchester and Liverpool.

The station located at New Canal Street and Curzon Street in what we now call Eastside, was first opened in June 1838, and the first passenger train arrived from London on the 17th September 1838. The station also had platforms for parcels, but there was no through trains.

The architect of the station was Philip Hardwick, while Robert Stephenson was the engineer in charge of building the line from London to Birmingham. The building was inspired by classical Roman architecture, following Hardwick's trip to Italy in 1818-19.

 

The following image shows Curzon Street Station as it was in 1838. It was published by E C & W Osborne and printed by E Y Moody Bros.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/2002V6 Curzon Street Station Birmingham 1838.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The next sketch shows Curzon Street from New Canal Street in 1839. It was an Engraving from Topographical Views  in Wilkinson Collection Vol iii.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1996V145.12 Birmingham Station Curzon Street.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A more recent drawing of Curzon Street Station dated 1950. It was an ink drawing by John L. Baker. Topographical view of Birmingham. By then the station was only being used for goods. It closed in 1966.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1996V86 Curzon Street Station Birmingham.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /> Images above are free to download from the Birmingham Museums Trust collection, Public Domain. Digital Image Resource. Creative Commons Zero Licence (CCO).

 

The coming of New Street Station to the closure of Curzon Street Station

The problem was that Curzon Street was not centrally located to the centre of town. So the railway companies decided to build a new station in the heard of the town centre. This would become Birmingham New Street Station, and it's first incarnation opened in 1854. Many services were transferred away from Curzon Street at the time. The station was modified at Banbury Street and New Canal Street by 1874, and was used from Easter that year for passenger excursion trips. Which it continued to do so, until it closed by Easter 1893. Such as on public bank holidays to Sutton Coldfield. The old 1838 platforms were not used as much by then.

Going into the 20th Century, the station continued to be used for goods until it closed for good in 1966. The platforms and original good sheds were demolished in the same year. The site was then used as a Parcelforce depot until that closed in 2006.

In the years before HS2 the land behind the station building was used as a public surface car park, and at one point could have been a redevelopment site called Curzone (which never happened in the end). The HS2 announcement in 2009 changed everything.

The surviving building became a Grade I listed building in 1952. At one point it was modified in 1839 to become a hotel called the Victoria. In 1841 a hotel extension was built and this was the Queen's Hotel. It was on Curzon Street. It was later renamed to The Railway Hotel, when another Queen's Hotel opened at New Street. The hotel at Curzon Street closed in 1900 and was demolished by 1980.

The council purchased the station building from British Rail in 1979 and was used by a University of Birmingham student group called 'Three Bugs Fringe Theatre'.

 

Plaques

Inside of Curzon Street Station is this plaque installed during 1947, which was the Centenary Year of the founding of The Institution of Mechanical Engineers on this site on the 27th January 1847. Photo taken in June 2014, during a visit to Birmingham's Hidden Spaces at Curzon Street Station.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The building also received a Civic Trust Award in 1983. This was probably after Curzon Street Station was restored in the late 1970s and early 1980s (after it had fell into disrepair by 1979). Also seen at Birmingham's Hidden Spaces.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

There is a plaque on the front of the building that was placed on the New Canal Street side of the building in 1988, on the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the first train from London to Birmingham on Monday 17th September 1838. Photo below taken in April 2009. It is now longer possible to see this plaque while HS2 build their new station.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Apr 2009) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Curzon Street Station - exterior of the building 2009 to 2021

Now a gallery of photos of Curzon Street Station taken over the last 12 years or so.

 

View of Curzon Street Station from New Canal Street, taken April 2009. Millennium Point can be seen to the left.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Apr 2009) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A view taken during August 2009 of Curzon Street Station from a now lost road called Bartholomew Street. By then it had long since been closed off. And would disappear by 2011-12 when Eastside City Park was built.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Aug 2009) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

It is now January 2010, and Curzon Street Station can again be seen from Bartholomew Street, but in the snow. The Woodman public house seen on the left.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Jan 2010) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

By February 2011, I was having a look at Curzon Street Station from the public car park on Curzon Street. All the windows and doors were boarded up. The Rotunda and Pavilions shopping centre were visible to the left of here. Sometimes this car park had been used for the odd fun fair over the years.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Feb 2011).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The hoardings on the left have not gone up for HS2, but for the building of Eastside City Park. Curzon Street Station seen from New Canal Street during September 2011.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Sep 2011) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

As late as March 2014, the site behind the old Curzon Street Station building was still being used as a public car park. Selfridges, Beetham Tower, Centre City Tower and the Rotunda were visible on the skyline at the time.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Mar 2014).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

By March 2017, it was clear that HS2 would soon take over the building. Hoarding artwork and banners had gone up. It was planned that Curzon Street would become a new cultural hub. The art was from a HS2 / BCU competition, which was won by Sarina Kaur, called Curzon Railway 1838 - 1966.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Mar 2017) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

By March 2020, and before the first lockdown, one last walk down New Canal Street before HS2 closed it off, it was also one last chance to see the Eagle & Tun pub before it was demolished. By then the Curzon Railway BCU art banners had been taken down, but the hoardings were still there.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Mar 2020).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A view from the train of Curzon Street Station during August 2020. After the first lockdown restrictions were being eased, I got a train from Stechford to Birmingham New Street. New Canal Street is now closed off, you can also see Millennium Point and The Woodman.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Aug 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

October 2020 from Curzon Street. The road beyond was closed by HS2. Was taking a pedestrian diversion from Digbeth to Eastside the long way around (via Lawley Middleway). As HS2 had cut off my old routes. This was before the second lockdown began.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Oct 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

By April 2021, the third lockdown restrictions were being eased, and got the train to Birmingham Moor Street for a walk around Eastside and Digbeth. This time via the Digbeth Branch Canal (which was faster than the route I took the autumn before). Took this view of Curzon Street Station from the canal.  The land all being prepared by HS2. The view might be lost in the future once the station is built, and it might bridge over the canal as well (not like the original brick Curzon Street Tunnel that crosses the canal towards New Street in Eastside).

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Apr 2021).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Early June 2021, and a view of Curzon Street Station taken from the Cross City Line, I caught the train at Birmingham New Street and got it to Sutton Coldfield. It looks like the turntable (to the far right of here) has been filled in. It's hard to imagine the other buildings that was here over 180 years ago. Millennium Point seen behind from the train. HS2 is a hive of activity.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Stn HS2 (Jun 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

For more photos and the feature, go here for the full gallery of Curzon Street Station in Birmingham Gems.

 

Birmingham's Hidden Spaces, June 2014

From the 21st to 29th June 2014, Birmingham's Hidden Spaces opened up Curzon Street Station to the public. It was an exhibition by Associated Architects, and in association with the Birmingham Post. I saw it on the 28th June 2014. This banner was on the outside of the building.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Inside the main foyer and a look up the staircase to the ceiling. Unfortunately it was too unsafe to go upstairs, so you could only see the ground floor and basement of the building.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Zooming up to the ceiling window.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (8).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This sign shows A Brief History of Curzon Street Station. Similar to the information I have presented above.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Another sign about Curzon Street Station built 1838. Philip Hardwick, architect, Robert Stephenson, engineer. Plus the restoration task force in 1983.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Going down the steps to the basement, would have been an exhibition on down here.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (6).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The rear door was open, so you could have a look outside. There wasn't much to see out there.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (9).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Modern 21st Century photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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Elliott Brown Education
02 Jun 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools - from Camp Hill in 1883 to Kings Heath in 1956-58

King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools is two Grammar schools on one site. The boys and the girls school. Founded in 1883, they were at a site at Camp Hill until they moved to Vicarage Road in Kings Heath (boys in 1956, girls in 1958). The old building survives at Camp Hill Circus near Bordesley Middleway and Stratford Road as The Bordesley Centre. The current school is next to Kings Heath Park.

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King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools - from Camp Hill in 1883 to Kings Heath in 1956-58





King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools is two Grammar schools on one site. The boys and the girls school. Founded in 1883, they were at a site at Camp Hill until they moved to Vicarage Road in Kings Heath (boys in 1956, girls in 1958). The old building survives at Camp Hill Circus near Bordesley Middleway and Stratford Road as The Bordesley Centre. The current school is next to Kings Heath Park.


King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools

In this third post on the King Edward VI schools founded in 1883, we look at King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys and King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls. Originally located at the top of the Stratford Road, near Sparkbrook and Bordesley. They relocated to a site at Vicarage Road and Cartland Road between 1956 and 1958. Unlike Five Ways, the old building at Camp Hill Circus still stands today, as The Bordesley Centre.

 

History of King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools

Today you can see the old building at the corner of Bordesley Middleway and the Stratford Road, if you are getting the bus around Camp Hill Circus (or travelling in other forms of transport). It was designed by Martin and Chamberlain, and first opened in 1883 for the King Edward VI Foundation. The building is now a Grade II* listed building. The builder was James Moffat. There was later additions to the building during the 20th century, with more alterations in the early 21st century.

The school of 1883 was the boys school, later the girls school was built by 1890. The school was built in the Gothic style. After the school moved to Kings Heath, the buildings was first used as a Teachers Training College, then by the City of Birmingham Polytechnic (later University of Central England, now Birmingham City University). It is now The Bordesley Centre, a religious, educational and advisory centre for Birmingham's Yemeni community, and run by the Muath Trust. The building was remodelled and refurbished in 2004-06.

Photos below taken during March 2012. First photo taken from Camp Hill near Camp Hill Circus. Bordesley Middleway on the left.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Bordesley Centre (Mar 2012) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Second photo taken from Bordesley Middleway near Camp Hill Circus. At the time went to see a plaque about The Ship Inn, the site of a pub that used to stand here. Was used by Prince Rupert, before his Royalist army attacked Birmingham at Easter 1643. The Ship Inn stood here from 1560 until 1972. It was rebuilt in the late 19th Century.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Bordesley Centre (Mar 2012) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools today in Kings Heath

The boys school relocated to a site in Kings Heath at Vicarage Road and Cartland Road during 1956. This is next to Kings Heath Park. While the house of the former estate here is now within Kings Heath Park, the gatehouse is in the grounds of the school near the Vicarage Road. Formerly owned by the Cartland family from 1880 until the 1900s (ancestors of the late Romance novel author Barbara Cartland). The girls school relocated to the site in 1958, and both the boys and girls schools share buildings. They also have playing fields at Kings Heath, which they would have had no room for at Camp Hill.

 

During October 2017 from the Vicarage Road in Kings Heath. Pupils can get off the 11C, 11A or 35 bus routes down here. Main entrance to the school is on the right. Just cross at the lights.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (Oct 2017) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This is the pedestrian entrance for pupils and visitors to the schools. Looked very autumnal that day.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (Oct 2017) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

In April 2019, a walk past King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools. Starting at Vicarage Road in Kings Heath near this sign (gatehouse behind).

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (Apr 2019) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Sign seen on Cartland Road. Reception for both schools on Vicarage Road.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (Apr 2019) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The sports field with rugby goalpost, modern buildings behind. Seen behind the fence on Cartland Road.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (Apr 2019) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Modern buildings shared by both the boys and girls school. I think they also share the sports field. Barbed wire on the fence at Cartland Road.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (Apr 2019) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A December 2019 view up the main drive to King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools. Looks like they built modern extensions to the 1950s buildings here. Lined by trees. At the time, the gate on Vicarage Road was open. There is ramps, so vehicles will have to drive slowly towards the schools.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (Dec 2019).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A more recent view of King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools, taken from Kings Heath Park during March 2021. The Cartland family formed the Priory Trust Co Ltd to manage the grounds. They wanted to develop houses, but ended up selling the land to the local council (Kings Norton and Northfield Urban District Council). The council opened the land as a park. Birmingham City Council took over the park and Kings Heath in 1911. The remaining land was sold to the council in 1914. The rest of the land of what is now King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools would have been purchased by the Foundation of the Schools of King Edward VI in Birmingham in the mid 1950s.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Spring KH Park (Mar 2021) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The Lodge to King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools

This is the Lodge to King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools. One of the oldest buildings at the school, it dates to the early 19th Century, and is a Grade II listed building. It is rendered, and Battlemented according to the Historic England listing, at 142 Vicarage Road. The lodge was formerly part of the estate of Kings Heath House, and was separated when a fence was erected between the schools and Kings Heath Park (probably in the late 1950s).

First view (below) taken from the 11A bus on Vicarage Road in Kings Heath during April 2017.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (Apr 2017).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The next view was taken from Kings Heath Park during Febraury 2018. You can see the modern fence separating the park and school grounds here.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (Feb 2018).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Another bus view, this time taken from the 11C during April 2018. You can see the lodge on the left, and the vehicle entrance driveway on the right to the schools.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (Apr 2018).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

School bus

In May 2017, I was on an 11A bus, when I passed this school bus for both King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys and King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls, seen on the Vicarage Road. Bus ID 112.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (May 2017) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

On this side advertising the girls school and their outstanding results! Co-education for all.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVICH Kings Heath (May 2017) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

My own history with King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys. I would have done the 11+ here during 1993-94, but I didn't pass it. I recall putting King Edward VI Five Ways School as my first choice, and King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys as my second. I ended up at my local Comprehensive school (which was in walking distance). Years later got the 11C on the way to my Sixth Form College (1999 - 2001). I now think I should have put Camp Hill as my number one. My late brother later got into Camp Hill. Of course I pass it now whenever I get the 11C or 11A past the school. Or go to Kings Heath Park.

 

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Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

 

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70 passion points
Elliott Brown Education
22 May 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

King Edward VI Five Ways School - from Five Ways in 1883 to Bartley Green in 1958

In the second of our posts on the Schools of King Edward VI in Birmingham (that was founded in 1883). This time we take a look at King Edward VI Five Ways School. Originally located at the junction of Ladywood Road and Hagley Road at Five Ways. They moved to a site on Scotland Lane in Bartley Green in 1958, near Bartley Reservoir. Was a boys only Grammar School until girls joined in 1988.

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King Edward VI Five Ways School - from Five Ways in 1883 to Bartley Green in 1958





In the second of our posts on the Schools of King Edward VI in Birmingham (that was founded in 1883). This time we take a look at King Edward VI Five Ways School. Originally located at the junction of Ladywood Road and Hagley Road at Five Ways. They moved to a site on Scotland Lane in Bartley Green in 1958, near Bartley Reservoir. Was a boys only Grammar School until girls joined in 1988.


King Edward VI Five Ways School

Today at Five Ways Island there is little evidence other than a plaque to tell you that a Grammar School used to be located at this busy traffic island. That school was King Edward VI Five Ways School, and it still exists today, although they have spent the last 63 years based in Bartley Green, on a site on Scotland Lane (next to Bartley Reservoir). The school is about 5 to 7 miles away from where they were originally located.

 

History of King Edward VI Five Ways School

The school was founded in 1883 as part of the Foundation of the Schools of King Edward VI in Birmingham. The school building was originally the former Edgbaston Proprietary School, at the junction of Ladywood Road and Hagley Road at Five Ways, Birmingham. The building was designed by J.A. Chatwin and opened in January 1883 by A. J. Mundella. At first the school had room for 350 boys. The first headmaster was E.H.F. MacCarthy, who remained in the post until his retirement in 1916. A building at the Bartley Green site was later named after him in his honour.

Public domain photo below dated to 1888 of the old King King Edward VI Five Ways School.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Five Ways School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Old KEVIFW.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

During the Second World War, the school evacuated to Monmouth, and the boys attended Monmouth School. After the war, the school was getting a bit too overcrowded, due to the development of land around Five Ways, and there was no room to expand. So the decision was taken to relocate the school to Bartley Green. The land was formerly Bartley Farm next to Bartley Reservoir, and the Foundation purchased it. The school opened there at Scotland Lane in April 1958.

After the school moved away from Five Ways, eventually the old building was demolished, and Five Ways Island was developed during the 1960s. Ladywood Road was renamed to Ladywood Middleway. Meanwhile an underpass was built under the island from Broad Street to Hagley Road in Edgbaston. Islington Row became Islington Row Middleway, while Calthorpe Road and Harborne Road remained with the same road names.

In January 1983, on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the opening of the school, this plaque (photo below below taken in 2009) was unveiled by Councillor P. Hollingworth (when Lord Mayor of Birmingham). It records King Edward VI Grammar School Five Ways from 16-1-1883 to 2-4-1958. The plaque was unveiled on 16-1-1983. It is below the Tubular Steel sculpture in the middle of Five Ways Island.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Five Ways School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVI Five Ways plaque (Jul 2009).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

When the Westside Metro extension to Hagley Road opens at the end of 2021, passengers will have little idea that they are travelling under the site of a former grammar school!

The site of Five Ways Island today in May 2021, as seen from the top of Calthorpe Road. The school would have been approximately where the Stainless steel sculpture is today, although I suspect part of it could have been where Metropolitan House is now (built 1972 to 1974, refurbished 2015-16).

dndimg alt="Five Ways Island" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Five Ways Island (May 2021).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

King Edward VI Five Ways School today in Bartley Green

The site at Bartley Green has been developed ever since they moved from Five Ways in 1958. This includes the Eyles and Chowen Centres, the former and current home of the Sixth Form Centre. A music block and technology block have been added, as well as a Sports Hall and the MacCarthy Block. The Science Wing was also expanded. In recent years, a sports pavilion was built, as well as an astro turf playing field, a mobile classroom and an Observatory was built. The Eyles building was renovated into the Eyles-Music Block, as the old Music block had become too small.

It was one of the first schools to get computer technology in 1978. This was achieved with links to Aston University. Girls have been admitted to the school since 1988. The school today is the largest co-educational grammar schools in the West Midlands and one of the top five co-ed grammar schools nationally.

 

I took these photos (below) of King Edward VI Five Ways School, back in early March 2021, during a return visit to Bartley Reservoir. The views of the school all taken from Scotland Lane in Bartley Green.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Five Ways School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVIFW Bartley Green (Mar 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The view of the modern school buildings taken through the gate on Scotland Lane.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Five Ways School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVIFW Bartley Green (Mar 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This road is the exit from the school. The entrance road is to the left.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Five Ways School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVIFW Bartley Green (Mar 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This sign welcomes you to King Edward VI Five Ways School.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Five Ways School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVIFW Bartley Green (Mar 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

An old King Edward's Royal Coat of Arms. I suspect they saved it from the old building at Five Ways in 1958. I'm not sure what else survived from the 1883 to 1958 building.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Five Ways School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVIFW Bartley Green (Mar 2021) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Zooming in to a modern Royal Coat of Arms sign of the school. Probably the Royal arms of King Edward VI?

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Five Ways School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVIFW Bartley Green (Mar 2021) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There is plenty of signs here you let you know that this is King Edward VI Five Ways School.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Five Ways School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVIFW Bartley Green (Mar 2021) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Later saw a tractor on the walk back fro Bartley Reservoir (before walking to Senneleys Park).

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Five Ways School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVIFW Bartley Green (Mar 2021) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Walking past the school, was my first time back since around 1993-94 when I was looking at Secondary Schools to go to. I even put it at as my number one choice for a Grammar School to go to in Birmingham (ahead of Camp Hill). Unfortunately I failed the 11+, and ended up at my local Comprehensive school (which was in walking distance). Then again King Edward VI Five Ways was too far to travel on two buses each day. And I now think I should have put Camp Hill as number one (too late now 28 years later of course). King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys was much closer to get to on the 11C (my late brother went there). The journey to Bartley Green would have taken well over an hour (including the no 18 bus). I only ever did that journey once in 2015 when I first went to Bartley Reservoir.

 

Go here for the post on King Edward VI Aston School.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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17 May 2021 - Elliott Brown
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King Edward VI Aston School - founded in 1883

Welcome to our first post of the Schools of King Edward VI in Birmingham. We are starting with King Edward VI Aston School. Which is between Albert Road and Frederick Road in Aston, and close to Aston Hall & Park. Founded in 1883, it is a Boys Grammar School. The Girls Grammar School moved to Handsworth in 1911. The architect was J A Chatwin. They are on the same site today,

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King Edward VI Aston School - founded in 1883





Welcome to our first post of the Schools of King Edward VI in Birmingham. We are starting with King Edward VI Aston School. Which is between Albert Road and Frederick Road in Aston, and close to Aston Hall & Park. Founded in 1883, it is a Boys Grammar School. The Girls Grammar School moved to Handsworth in 1911. The architect was J A Chatwin. They are on the same site today,


King Edward VI Aston School

In 1883, 5 new Grammar Schools were founded as part of the Foundation of the Schools of King Edward VI in Birmingham. One of them was King Edward VI Aston School. Located on a site between Albert Road and Frederick Road, it also goes down Upper Thomas Street. Not far from two entrances to Aston Hall & Park. This is the only school from the 1883 creation to remain on the same site to this day. It became a boys only school in 1911, when the girls school was moved to Handsworth, forming King Edward VI Handsworth School. The school is for boys aged 11 to 18. The architect was J A Chatwin.

Another building was opened in 1963 called Douglas House (after a Victorian villa had had been on the same site). It has since been extended, and was named the Watcyn Thomas Wing, after a former Welsh Rugby International who taught at the school for 37 years. It was opened in 2008 by Bob Simpson, and Aston Old Edwardian (what former pupils are called).

I noticed some building work going on near Upper Thomas Street (May 2021).

 

The photo of King Edward VI Aston School below was taken in September 2003 by Wikimedia Commons user Mdsalih. I only ever once went into the school around 1993-94, looking at Grammar Schools. I never put Aston as a choice, but ended up at my local comprehensive school after failing the 11+.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Aston School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/King Edward VI Aston School.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

All photos below are mine, taken on my most recent visit to Aston Hall & Park during May 2021.

Wasn't much to see from Upper Thomas Street, what with the building works, and double fences.

These views taken from Albert Road.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Aston School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVI Aston School (May 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Suprisingly the building isn't even Grade II listed. I didn't see a sign saying King Edward VI Aston School.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Aston School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVI Aston School (May 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Car parking from the residents of the houses opposite.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Aston School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVI Aston School (May 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There is some modern houses built to the left of the school on Albert Road.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Aston School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVI Aston School (May 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Heading onto Bevington Road, a quick look at Frederick Road. I once took this entrance to Aston Park about 5 years ago, although didn't really notice the school. The building below is probably Douglas House (of 1963), near the Aston Park Play Area.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Aston School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVI Aston School (May 2021) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The 1883 buildings by J A Chatwin seen from Frederick Road. More modern houses, and cars parked by local residents.

dndimg alt="King Edward VI Aston School" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/KEVI Aston School (May 2021) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Look out soon for posts on King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools (Boys and Girls) and King Edward VI Five Ways School. Both schools which are no longer on their original sites. Camp Hill moved to Kings Heath, while Five Ways moved to Bartley Green.

See also my post on King Edward's School.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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